UNTAPPED TALENT POOLS


When employers are filling open jobs, there are some groups of workers that are more likely to be overlooked for a variety of reasons, reasons that have nothing to do with whether they can do the work, or learn the skills needed to do the work. Tapping into these overlooked groups of potential employees can be a value-add for organizations of all sizes, enriching the workplace with a diversity of thoughts, life experiences, and cultural backgrounds.

“Talent is equally distributed, opportunity is not.”

- Leila Janah, Sama Group CEO

THE TABLE: VETERANS AND WORK


Every year, more than 200,000 military veterans make the transition into civilian life.

While they prove to be excellent employees, many of them experience underemployment due to a mismatch of their military skills and experience and the civilian labor market.

WorkingNation convened a group of business and education leaders to discuss ways to make navigating the workplace less difficult for veterans.

Produced by Joan Lynch and Melissa Panzer

Directed by Jonathan Barenboim

TAP INTO YOUR OWN SKILLS, BE YOUR OWN BOSS


Fourteen percent of all veterans—approximately 1.2 million men and women—work in one of five industries most impacted by the COVID-19 closures. We take a closer look at a program that is training veterans to be entrepreneurs.

EXPERIENCE SHOULD BE VALUED


The pandemic has hard-hit the older worker population. But advocates say people who are 40 and older bring a wealth of experience to employers and should not be overlooked. These workers should expand their digital skills to remain active in the workplace.

DON'T OVERLOOK THE OLDER WORKER


Older workers often face discrimination from hiring managers who think they won’t fit in with the culture or don’t have the modern skills needed to do the job. How do we dispel these outdated stereotypes? Paul Irving and Gary Officer join Ramona Schindelheim for this Work in Progress podcast.

THE NEED FOR EQUALITY IN OPPORTUNITY

Unemployment rates are typically higher in communities of color. One organization - in a community-based effort - actively connects residents of a Los Angeles neighborhood to good jobs with local employers. Participants say their lives are forever changed.

COMBATING RECIDIVISM THROUGH EDUCATION


The recidivism rate drops when the formerly incarcerated are properly educated and prepared with job skills. Often, these men and women are held back in their pursuit of meaningful work by a variety of obstacles, including injustices in the justice system, a lack of career and skill pathways, societal bias, and a lack of personal networks.

WorkingNation's Melissa Panzer sat down for a thoughtful conversation with some of the most committed people focused on giving the formerly incarcerated equal access to opportunity.

Here are some are some of the questions and their answers.

Q: Why is training the incarerated good for society?

Aly Tamboura Manager, Justice & Opportunity Initiative, CZI

Q: How do corporate partnership improve outcomes?

Heather Higginbottom President, JPMorgan Chase Policy Center

Q: What is necessary for reentry for be successful?

Beverly Parenti Founder, Executive Director , The Last Mile

Q: How do you ensure company buy-in once the decision is made to hire the formally incarcerated?

Heather Higginbottom President, JPMorgan Chase Policy Center

ALY TAMBOURA


UNLOCKED: NONPROFITS CAN REDUCE RECIDIVISM