INQUIRE WITHIN


AMERICA'S FRONTLINE WORKERS


There are millions of jobs that cannot be done from home sitting in front of a computer. These are people who are on the frontline of our workforce, who are essential to our workforce, even if it has taken a pandemic to recognize their value. How do we ensure they, too, have the opportunity to achieve financial security and a good job that gives them a sense of purpose?


EXPANDING YOUR DEFINITION OF "ESSENTIAL"


The workers that staff your grocery store, drive the local bus, and deliver your packages are playing key roles in keeping our day-to-day lives on track. Going forward, this workforce should have greater access to opportunities that will allow them to advance.

CREDENTIALED TO CARE


Many essential workers are in the health care and emergency response fields. Some start out with low-paying jobs, but can move into roles that offer a higher wage, with the help of training programs that offer them credentials.

FROM FARM TO MARKET: HOW FOOD GETS TO YOUR TABLE


Over the last six months, we have seen the heroic efforts of frontline workers. Among them are the people who work at your local market. But perhaps, you haven’t considered the people who work to get the produce to your grocery store. This animated film explains what a vegetable supply chain looks like, while hearing the voices of real farmers, distributors, shippers, and sellers to show how it all gets done.

Produced by Melissa Panzer and Alicia Clark

SARAH KALLOCH


WHAT MAKES A JOB A "GOOD JOB"?

How should we, as a society, define a “good job”? WorkingNation’s editor-in-chief Ramona Schindelheim puts the question to Sarah Kalloch, executive director of the Good Jobs Institute. Kalloch says there are two parts to the answer: the basic financial needs and the higher, emotional needs. Listen to the discussion in this Work in Progress podcast.